Anti-Defamation League

If you want to talk about a civil rights organization that grapples for the plight of Jewish people, then the Anti-Defamation League is a good subject for conversation.

Being pro-Zionist, they affirm that anything that is anti-Israel is anti-Semitic. This is a disputable idea, because there are plenty of pro-Jewish views out there that are either anti-Zionist or just neutral on the matter of Zionism. Not every individual who identifies as being Jewish agrees with Zionism and what is currently going in in the Middle East in Israel’s favor. There was an episode of “Broad City,” a comedy show on Comedy Central, that poked fun at Zionism.

For those who don’t know what “Broad City” is, it is a light-hearted, positive, “feminist” show about two young, college aged Jewish women living in New York. They go through their silly, realistic, comical, sometimes exaggerated experiences as they hang out, positively embrace their common Jewish heritage and grow up. In one episode, they go on a “Return” trip to Israel.

Their trip to Israel doesn’t turn out well as planned, and they end up coming back to New York. Once they come back to New York, they make a resolution to go to a falafal restaurant in the city, saying that it is “better than the real thing.”

The point of this episode runs along the lines of saying that Zionism and Israel aren’t the end-all-be-all, and that now other places are the homes of the Jews, not just Israel. Jewish identity as a Jew in a place that isn’t Israel is just as valid, important and full of substance as a Jewish identity of being a Jew in Israel. Learn more about Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey: http://www.laceyandlarkinfronterafund.org/about-lacey-larkin-frontera-fund/jim-larkin/

The whole point of explaining this episode of “Broad City” is that there are many views on the gamut of Judaism, and even though the Anti-Defamation League has certain views, that doesn’t mean that they speak for every single Jewish person—even if they claim to do that.

Lacey and Larking Frontera Fund

Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey take note of the fact that there are human beings roving through the deserts between America and Mexico, desperate for safe havens and supportive communities. These people need help to fulfill various levels of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. What is Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs? It is a triangle of needs that looks kind of like the older versions of the American government’s food pyramid. Read more: Jim Larkin | Angel.co and Michael Lacey | LinkedIn

On the bottom of the triangle are the most immediate, basic needs. These types of needs have to do with procuring shelter, food, water and warmth. On the top of the triangle are the needs that come after the most immediate physical needs that are just as important, but are not as necessary for immediate survival.

These needs include emotional support, friendships, relationships, a sense of fulfillment and a sense of community. Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey give support to organizations that fulfill each level of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs for immigrants.

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